Alltrack MPG: Best City & Best Highway

2017 Golf Alltrack - MPG talk

Here’s my Alltrack fuel economy findings after two years and 20k miles in my 2017 Golf Alltrack:

City

Floor: 20 MPG, Ceiling: 30 MPG

Highway

Floor: 30 MPG, Ceiling: 45 MPG

The Truth About Cold Engines

There’s a city MPG caveat. Anyone can get 10 MPG city if you just drive a mile. That’s because there’s a hole you have to dig out of every time you start your car, and that hole is the warmup period. When the engine is cold, like when you start it, it’s just going to give you crap MPG. Every ICE (internal combustion engine) car is like this. Just please, don’t idle your car to warm it up. This pollutes more than if you just drive.

When the warmup is complete, usually after 1-3 miles or around 5 minutes, you’ll get decent fuel economy. My figures include warmup time, but exclude trips of less than 3 miles.

Driving Style Affects Fuel Economy

The reason I have floors and ceilings on my MPG numbers is because driving styles vary… in my case they vary wildly. Sometimes I drive fast (but safely). Sometimes I accelerate very slowly and try to preserve momentum to reduce the frequency of using the gas pedal.

Alltrack Ownership at 5k Miles: What I’m Unhappy With

Alltrack Ownership: In for Service

My 2017 Alltrack has been in once for service of any kind, this one being of the unscheduled variety to treat a mildew AC smell. The dealer fixed a slow leak (nail) in the right rear tire for free. Tires are a separate warranty, between the owner and the tire manufacturer.

Alltrack Ownership: Fuel Economy

On the way back from a New Mexico roadtrip, my Alltrack averaged 33.6 MPG, which is not that great for highway travel, but at 77 MPH, which is nice and quick.

Historically, my Alltrack has achieved anywhere from 28 to 41 MPG highway.

33 MPG fuel economy in my Golf Alltrack
33 MPG fuel economy in my Golf Alltrack

Alltrack Ownership: She’s at 5k Miles

My Alltrack’s 5000 mile mark came right about at the 6 month mark… which is where I thought she would be. After all, I did buy the factory extended warranty at 10 years/100k miles. See what I paid for the 10/100 VW Alltrack factory warranty here.

See my one-month Alltrack ownership impressions.

And now, the Unhappiness

The oil color continues to worry me, and now it’s really dark. I don’t like this factory scheduled oil change stuff. If it was my old Volvo 850, I’d simply change the oil.

The tires have no curb-rash bead to protect the rims, and so I’ve curbed them twice, leaving small “curb rash” marks in the finish. This isn’t so much a gripe with the car, obviously, but I think VW cheaped out on the tire brand/model, which is Falken.

The track is a little wider than my old Volvo 850, so my curb proximity sense is a little off when I park.

The 2018 Golf models get a 6-year, 72k mile warranty, which is significantly better than the 2017s, which were covered by a 3-year, 36k mile warranty, which was too low for me so I forked out a few thousand dollars to get a 10/100k warranty.

The seat continues to bother me… lack of thigh support specifically.

Three Things I Always Do For My Alltrack

I’m a careful Golf Alltrack owner. Maybe paranoid. Whatever the case, I take good care of her.

  1. I never go past 3k RPM until oil temp is > 180
  2. 4/5 times I fill her up with Shell premium — 5/5 times premium
  3. I never take it to car washes

I have to work to get under 23 MPG city, for trips over 8 miles or so. The engine has loosened up. This is an improvement since the first month of ownership, when my Alltrack was averaging 23 MPG.

Dieselgate Expands to Gasoline VWs

Dieselgate Expands to Gasoline VWs

News is breaking that VW cheated on gasoline car emissions in addition to the already-revealed diesel cheating (“Dieselgate”). Bloomberg reports “Gasgate” affects the VW group’s 1.4-liter gasoline engine. The 800,000 European market cars emit more carbon dioxide and achieve fewer miles per gallon (MPG) than the automaker stated when the cars were certified.


Oh man. Oh man oh man oh man. VW wasn’t doing one bad, bad thing, they were doing several bad things.


What does management know? It seems like they were kept in the dark about the emissions-cheating software. Or at least that what they want us to think.

Meanwhile, VW stock is getting (re) hammered, now 39% below its price before Dieselgate.

The latest issues affect Volkswagen’s Polo, Golf and Passat models, Audi’s subcompact A1 and A3 hatchback, the Skoda Octavia, and the Seat Ibiza and Leon, with most in Europe. While smaller diesel motors account for the vast majority of affected cars, a specific type of 1.4-liter gasoline engine is also involved, the company said. Germany’s Transport Minister Alexander Dobrindt said that 98,000 gasoline cars are affected.

atw Commentary

Whatever the case, our question at atw is this:

  1. All this stuff is easily verified. CO2, MPG, etc… science gave us the tools to measure these things roughly a hundred years ago. Why were our governments, so stuffed with regulatory money, not testing these cars? Why were they taking VW’s word for it?

That’s it. Just one question. We don’t get it. A couple smart ten-year-olds could test fuel efficiency, given a legal driver. The carbon dioxide and diesel cheats are also easily tested, relatively speaking. Although those would require high school age kids.